Spine and Neurological Conditions

Below you will be able to browse a list of spine and neurological conditions that Burak Ozgur, MD treats. He is committed to making sure each of our patients are knowledgeable on these conditions in order to seek proper treatment.



Back and Neck

Cervical spondylosis is also called cervical osteoarthritis. It is a condition involving changes to the bones, discs, and joints of the neck. These changes are caused by the normal wear-and-tear of aging. With age, the discs of the cervical spine gradually break down, lose fluid, and become stiffer. Cervical spondylosis usually occurs in middle-aged and elderly people. Read More ➲
Degenerative disc disease is not really a disease but a term used to describe the normal changes in your spinal discs as you age. Spinal discs are soft, compressible discs that separate the interlocking bones (vertebrae) that make up the spine. The discs act as shock absorbers for the spine, allowing it to flex, bend, and twist. Degenerative disc disease can take place throughout the spine, but it most often occurs in the discs in the lower back (lumbar region) and the neck (cervical region). Read More ➲
Back pain symptoms can range in intensity from mild to severe. Chronic pain may originate with an initial trauma/injury or infection, or there may be an ongoing cause of pain. Some people suffer chronic pain in the absence of any past injury or evidence of body damage. Read More ➲
After any spine surgery, a percentage of patients may still experience pain. This is called failed back or failed fusion syndrome, symptoms of which is characterized by intractable pain and an inability to return to normal activities. Surgery may be able to fix the condition but not eliminate the pain. Surgery may be able to fix the condition but not eliminate the pain. Read More ➲
The bones (vertebrae) that form the spine in your back are cushioned by small, spongy discs. When these discs are healthy, they act as shock absorbers for the spine and keep the spine flexible. But when a disc is damaged, it may bulge or break open. This is called a herniated disc. It may also be called a slipped or ruptured disc. You can have a herniated disc in any part of your spine. But most herniated discs affect the lower back (lumbar spine). Some happen in the neck (cervical spine) and, more rarely, in the upper back (thoracic spine). Read More ➲
When viewed from the back, the spine should run straight down the middle of the back. When abnormalities of the spine occur, the natural curvatures of the spine are misaligned or exaggerated in certain areas, as occurs with lordosis, kyphosis, and scoliosis. Kyphosis is characterized by an abnormally rounded upper back (more than 50 degrees of curvature). Read More ➲
Cervical myelopathy refers to compression on the cervical spinal cord from either a disc herniation or cervical spinal stenosis. Generally, it is more common in the elderly population and is a slow process. Symptoms include incoordination in the hands, a heavy feeling in the legs, or numbness and tingling in the legs. It is generally a slowly progressive condition. It is usually not painful as compression of the spinal cord does not cause pain. Read More ➲
Neck pain can occur anywhere in your neck, from the bottom of your head to the top of your shoulders. It can spread to your upper back or arms. It may limit how much you can move your head and neck. Neck pain is common, especially in people older than 50. Most neck pain is caused by activities that strain the neck. Slouching, painting a ceiling, or sleeping with your neck twisted are some things that can cause neck pain. These kinds of activities can lead to neck strain, a sprain, or a spasm of the neck muscles. Read More ➲
Scoliosis is a medical condition in which a person’s spine is curved from side to side. Although it is a complex three-dimensional deformity, on an X-ray, viewed from the rear, the spine of an individual with scoliosis can resemble an “S” or a “?”, rather than a straight line. Read More ➲

Spine

Chiari malformations are structural defects in the cerebellum. That’s the part of the brain that controls balance. Some people with Chiari malformations may have no symptoms.Read More ➲
Facet joint syndrome, also called spinal osteoarthritis or spinal arthritis, occurs when the cartilage that line the facet joints in the spine deteriorates, resulting in the bones rubbing directly against each other. Read More ➲
Nerves extend from your brain and spinal cord, sending important messages throughout your body. If you have a pinched nerve (nerve compression) your body may send you warning signals such as pain. Don’t ignore these warning signals. Damage from a pinched nerve may be minor or severe. It may cause temporary or long-lasting problems. The earlier you get a diagnosis and treatment for nerve compression, the more quickly you’ll find relief. Read More ➲
Osteoarthritis (OA) is caused by aging joints, injury, and obesity. OA symptoms include joint pain and stiffness. Treatment depends on the affected joint, including the hand, wrist, neck, back, knee, and hip, and involves medication and exercise. If you are overweight, weight loss may improve OA symptoms. Read More ➲
Piriformis syndrome is a neuromuscular disorder that is caused when the piriformis muscle compresses the sciatic nerve. The piriformis muscle is a flat, band-like muscle located in the buttocks near the top of the hip joint. This muscle is important in lower body movement because it stabilizes the hip joint and lifts and rotates the thigh away from the body. This enables us to walk, shift our weight from one foot to another, and maintain balance. It is also used in sports that involve lifting and rotating the thighs — in short, in almost every motion of the hips and legs. Read More ➲
Radiculopathy refers to a set of conditions in which one or more nerves is affected and does not work properly (a neuropathy). The emphasis is on the nerve root (radix= “root”). This can result in pain (radicular pain), weakness, numbness, or difficulty controlling specific muscles. Read More ➲
Sacroiliac joint dysfunction or incompetence generally refers to pain in the sacroiliac joint region that is caused by abnormal motion in the sacroiliac joint, either too much motion or too little motion. It typically results in inflammation of the sacroiliac joint, and can be debilitating. Read More ➲
Sciatica is a set of symptoms including pain caused by general compression or irritation of one of five spinal nerve roots of each sciatic nerve—or by compression or irritation of the left or right or both sciatic nerves. Symptoms include lower back pain, buttock pain, and numbness, pain or weakness in various parts of the leg and foot. Other symptoms include a “pins and needles” sensation, or tingling and difficulty moving or controlling the leg. Typically, symptoms only manifest on one side of the body. The pain may radiate above the knee, but does not always. Read More ➲
Spinal stenosis is an abnormal narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal canal that may occur in any of the regions of the spine. This narrowing causes a restriction to the spinal canal, resulting in a neurological deficit. Symptoms include pain, numbness, paraesthesia, and loss of motor control. The location of the stenosis determines which area of the body is affected. Read More ➲
Cancer can affect the spine and its components by a number of types of spinal tumors. Most tumors in the spine are metastatic – they spread from another part of the body into the spinal region and cause pain. Read More ➲
Spondylolisthesis is the forward displacement of a vertebra, especially the fifth lumbar vertebra, most commonly occurring after a break or fracture. Backward displacement is referred to as retrolisthesis. Read More ➲
Thoracic Epidural Arteriovenous Malformation Disease, or TEAM Disease, are tangles of abnormal blood vessels that directly connect arteries and veins. Symptoms include weakness or numbness of the arms or legs, or bowel or bladder disturbance, that may be caused by elevated pressure on the spinal cord.Read More ➲
Tethered spinal cord syndrome (TCS) or occult spinal dysraphism sequence refers to a group of neurological disorders that relate to malformations of the spinal cord. All forms involve the pulling of the spinal cord at the base of the spinal canal, literally a tethered cord. The spinal cord normally hangs loose in the canal, free to move up and down with growth, and with bending and stretching. A tethered cord, however, is held taut at the end or at some point in the spinal canal. In children, a tethered cord can force the spinal cord to stretch as they grow. In adults the spinal cord stretches in the course of normal activity, usually leading to progressive spinal cord damage if untreated. TCS is often associated with the closure of a spina bifida. It can be congenital, such as in tight filum terminale, or the result of injury later in life. Read More ➲

 

To request an appointment with Burak Ozgur, MD, one of the best neurosurgeons in the US specializing in minimally invasive spine surgery, please call (949) 383-4190 or toll free 888-64-SPINE or Contact Us ➲.